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Introducing: Backup Certificates

Introducing: Backup Certificates

At Cloudflare, we pride ourselves in giving every customer the ability to provision a TLS certificate for their Internet application — for free. Today, we are responsible for managing the certificate lifecycle for almost 45 million certificates from issuance to deployment to renewal. As we build out the most resilient, robust platform, we want it to be “future-proof” and resilient against events we can’t predict.

Events that cause us to re-issue certificates for our customers, like key compromises, vulnerabilities, and mass revocations require immediate action. Otherwise, customers can be left insecure or offline. When one of these events happens, we want to be ready to mitigate impact immediately. But how?

By having a backup certificate ready to deploy — wrapped with a different private key and issued from a different Certificate Authority than the primary certificate that we serve.

Events that lead to certificate re-issuance

Cloudflare re-issues certificates every day — we call this a certificate renewal. Because certificates come with an expiration date, when Cloudflare sees that a certificate is expiring soon, we initiate a new certificate renewal order. This way, by the time the certificate expires, we already have an updated certificate deployed and ready to use for TLS termination.

Unfortunately, not all certificate renewals are initiated by the expiration date. Sometimes, unforeseeable events like key compromises can lead to certificate renewals. This is because a new key needs to be issued, and therefore a corresponding certificate does as well.

Key Compromises

A key compromise is when an unauthorized person or system obtains the private key that is used to encrypt and decrypt secret information — security personnel’s worst nightmare. Key compromises can be the result of a vulnerability, such as Heartbleed, where a bug in a system can cause the private key to be leaked. They can also be the result of malicious actions, such as a rogue employee accessing unauthorized information. In the event of a key compromise, it’s crucial that (1) new private keys are immediately issued, (2) new certificates are deployed, and (3) the old certificates are revoked.

The Heartbleed Vulnerability

In 2014, the Heartbleed vulnerability was exposed. It allowed attackers to extract the TLS certificate private key for any server that was running the affected version of OpenSSL, a popular encryption library. We patched the bug and then as a precaution, quickly reissued private keys and TLS certificates belonging to all of our customers, even though none of our keys were leaked. Cloudflare’s ability to act quickly protected our customers’ data from being exposed.

Heartbleed was a wake-up call. At the time, Cloudflare’s scale was a magnitude smaller. A similar vulnerability at today’s scale would take us weeks, not hours to re-issue all of our customers certificates.

Now, with backup certificates, we don’t need to worry about initiating a mass re-issuance in a small time frame. Instead, customers will already have a certificate that we’ll be able to instantly deploy. Not just that, but the backup certificate will also be wrapped with a different key than the primary certificate, preventing it from being impacted by a key compromise.

Key compromises are one of the main reasons certificates need to be re-issued at scale. But other events can prompt re-issuance as well, including mass revocations by Certificate Authorities.

Mass Revocations from CAs

Today, the Certificate Authority/Browser Forum (CA/B Forum) is the governing body that sets the rules and standards for certificates. One of the Baseline Requirements set by the CA/B Forum states that Certificate Authorities are required to revoke certificates whose keys are at risk of being compromised within 24 hours. For less immediate issues, such as certificate misuse or violation of a CA’s Certificate Policy, certificates need to be revoked within five days. In both scenarios, certificates will be revoked by the CA in a short timeframe and immediate re-issuance of certificates is required.

While mass revocations aren’t commonly initiated by CAs, there have been a few occurrences throughout the last few years. Recently, Let’s Encrypt had to revoke roughly 2.7 million certificates when they found a non-compliance in their implementation of a DCV challenge. In this case, Cloudflare customers were unaffected.

Another time, one of the Certificate Authorities that we use found that they were renewing certificates based on validation tokens that did not comply with the CA/B Forum standards. This caused them to invoke a mass revocation, impacting about five thousand Cloudflare-managed domains. We worked with our customers and the CA to issue new certificates before the revocation, resulting in minimal impact.

We understand that mistakes happen, and we have been lucky enough that as these issues have come up, our engineering teams were able to mitigate quickly so that no customers were impacted. But that’s not enough: our systems need to be future-proof so that a revocation of 45 million certificates will have no impact on our customers. With backup certificates, we’ll be ready for a mass re-issuance, no matter the scale.

To be resilient against mass revocations initiated by our CAs, we are going to issue every backup certificate from a different CA than the primary certificate. This will add a layer of protection if one of our CAs will have to invoke a mass revocation — something that when initiated, is a ticking time bomb.

Challenges when Renewing Certificates

Scale: With great power, comes great responsibility

When the Heartbleed vulnerability was exposed, we had to re-issue about 100,000 certificates. At the time, this wasn’t a challenge for Cloudflare. Now, we are responsible for tens of millions of certificates. Even if our systems are able to handle this scale, we rely on our Certificate Authority partners to be able to handle it as well. In the case of an emergency, we don’t want to rely on systems that we do not control. That’s why it’s important for us to issue the certificates ahead of time, so that during a disaster, all we need to worry about is getting the backup certificates deployed.

Manual intervention for completing DCV

Another challenge that comes with re-issuing certificates is Domain Control Validation (DCV). DCV is a check used to validate the ownership of a domain before a Certificate Authority can issue a certificate for it. When customers onboard to Cloudflare, they can either delegate Cloudflare to be their DNS provider, or they can choose to use Cloudflare as a proxy while maintaining their current DNS provider.

When Cloudflare acts as the DNS provider for a domain, we can add Domain Control Validation (DCV) records on our customer’s behalf. This makes the certificate issuance and renewal process much simpler.

Domains that don’t use Cloudflare as their DNS provider — we call them partial zones — have to rely on other methods for completing DCV. When those domains proxy their traffic through us, we can complete HTTP DCV on their behalf, serving the HTTP DCV token from our Edge. However, customers that want their certificate issued before proxying their traffic need to manually complete DCV. In an event where Cloudflare has to re-issue thousands or millions of certificates, but cannot complete DCV on behalf of the customer, manual intervention will be required. While completing DCV is not an arduous task, it’s not something that we should rely on our customers to do in an emergency, when they have a small time frame, with high risk involved.

This is where backup certificates come into play. From now on, every certificate issuance will fire two orders: one for a certificate from the primary CA and one for the backup certificate. When we can complete the DCV on behalf of the customer, we will do so for both CAs.

Today, we’re only issuing backup certificates for domains that use Cloudflare as an Authoritative DNS provider. In the future, we’ll order backup certificates for partial zones. That means that for backup certificates for which we are unable to complete DCV, we will give customers the corresponding DCV records to get the certificate issued.

Backup Certificates Deployment Plan

We are happy to announce that Cloudflare has started deploying backup certificates on Universal Certificate orders for Free customers that use Cloudflare as an Authoritative DNS provider. We have been slowly ramping up the number of backup certificate orders and in the next few weeks, we expect every new Universal certificate pack order initiated on a Free, Pro, or Biz account to include a backup certificate, wrapped with a different key and issued from a different CA than the primary certificate.

At the end of April we will start issuing backup certificates for our Enterprise customers. If you’re an Enterprise customer and have any questions about backup certificates, please reach out to your Account Team.

Next Up: Backup Certificates for All

Today, Universal certificates make up 72% of the certificates in our pipeline. But we want full coverage! That’s why our team will continue building out our backup certificates pipeline to support Advanced Certificates and SSL for SaaS certificates. In the future, we will also issue backup certificates for certificates that our customers upload themselves, so they can have a backup they can rely on.

In addition, we will continue to improve our pipeline to make the deployment of backup certificates instantaneous — leaving our customers secure and online in an emergency.

At Cloudflare, our mission is to help build a better Internet. With backup certificates, we’re helping build a secure, reliable Internet that’s ready for any disaster. Interested in helping us out? We’re hiring.

Source:: CloudFlare