Migrating cdnjs to serverless with Workers KV

By GIXnews
Migrating cdnjs to serverless with Workers KV

Cloudflare powers

Today, if you want to include your JavaScript library in cdnjs, you first create a PR on GitHub to our new repository cdnjs/packages. The repo is easily cloneable at 50MB and consists of thousands of JSON files, each describing a cdnjs package and how it is auto-updated from npm or git. Once your file is validated by our automated CI—powered by a new bot—and merged by a maintainer, your package would be automatically enrolled in our auto-update service.

In the new system, security and maintainability are prioritized. For starters, cdnjs version files are created by our bot, minimizing the possibility of human error when merging a new version. While the JSON files in cdnjs/packages are added by error-prone humans, they are inspected by our bot before being approved by a maintainer. Each file is automatically validated against a JSON schema, as well as checked for popularity on npm or GitHub.

When the bot discovers a new release, it pushes Brotli and gzip-compressed versions of the files to a files namespace in Workers KV. With each entry, the bot writes some metadata in Workers KV for the ETag and Last-Modified HTTP headers. Similar to before, the bot also computes Subresource Integrity (SRI) hashes of the uncompressed files, but now pushes them instead to a SRIs namespace in Workers KV.

Then, when a new file is requested from cdnjs.cloudflare.com, a Cloudflare Worker will inspect the client’s Accept-Encoding header, fetching either the Brotli or gzip-compressed version with its ETag and Last-Modified metadata from Workers KV. As the compressed file travels back through Cloudflare, it is cached for future requests and uncompressed on-the-fly if needed.

At the moment, there are still a handful of files exceeding Workers KV’s size limit. Consequently, if the Cloudflare Worker fails to retrieve a file from Workers KV, it is fetched from the origin backed by the original git repo. In the coming months, we plan on gradually removing this infrastructure.

Scaling the website and API

Migrating cdnjs to serverless with Workers KV

Besides the core cdnjs infrastructure, many of its other components received upgrades as well!

On the cdnjs project’s homepage, you will be greeted by a slick new beta website built by Matt. Constructed with Vue and Nuxt, the beta website is powered entirely by the cdnjs API. As a result, it is always up-to-date with the latest package information and requires low resource usage to serve the site—which runs completely on the client-side after the first page load—helping us scale with cdnjs’s never-ending growth.

In fact, the cdnjs API also strengthened its scalability, benefitting from a serverless architecture close to the one we have seen with cdnjs and Workers KV.

Before migrating to Workers KV, the cdnjs API relied on a regularly scheduled process that involved generating about 300MB of metadata. The cdnjs API’s backend would then fetch this enormous “package.min.js” file into memory and use it to operate the API. If you are curious, the file is still being hosted here, but be warned—it may lag your browser! Similarly, file SRIs were pushed to cdnjs/SRIs, which was cloned by the API locally to serve SRI responses.

After all cdnjs files (within the permitted size limit) were moved to Workers KV, these legacy processes became unsustainable, requiring millions of reads and an unreasonable amount of time. Therefore, we decided to upload all metadata found into Workers KV. We split the metadata into four namespaces—one for package-level metadata, one for version-specific metadata, one containing aggregated metadata, and one for file SRIs.

Similar to cdnjs’s serverless design, a Cloudflare Worker sits on top of metadata.speedcdnjs.com, serving data from Workers KV using several public endpoints. Currently, the cdnjs API is fully integrated with these endpoints, which provide an elegant solution as cdnjs continues to scale.

Transparency and the future of cdnjs

Since its birth in January 2011, cdnjs has always been deeply rooted in transparency, deriving its strength from the community. Even when cdnjs exploded in size and its founders Ryan Kirkman and Thomas Davis teamed up with us in June 2011, the project remained entirely open-source on GitHub.

As the years passed, it became harder for the founders to stay active, heavily depending on the community for support. With a nearly nonexistent budget and little access to the repository, core cdnjs maintainers were challenged every day to keep the project alive.

Last year, this led us to contact the founders, who were happy to have our assistance with the project. With Cloudflare’s increased role, cdnjs is as stable as ever, with active members from both Cloudflare and the community.

However, as we remove our reliance on the legacy system and store files in Workers KV, there are concerns that cdnjs will become proprietary. Don’t worry, we are working hard to ensure that cdnjs remains as transparent and open-source as possible. To help the community audit updates to Workers KV, there is a new repository, cdnjs/logs, which is used by the bot to log all Workers KV-related events. Furthermore, anyone can validate the integrity of cdnjs files by fetching SRIs from the cdnjs API.

Conclusion

Overall, this past year has been a turbulent time for cdnjs, but all of its shortcomings have acted as red flags to help us build a better system. Most recently, we have mitigated the risks of depending on physical machines at a single location, migrating cdnjs to a serverless infrastructure where its files are stored in Workers KV.

Today, cdnjs is in good hands, and is not going away anytime soon. Shout out especially to the maintainers Sven and Matt for creating tons of momentum with the project, working on everything from scaling cdnjs to editing this post.

Moving forward, we are committed to making cdnjs as transparent as possible. As we continue to improve cdnjs, we will release more blog posts to keep the community up to date. If you are interested, please subscribe to our blog. After all, it is the community that makes cdnjs possible! A special thanks to our active GitHub contributors and members of the cdnjs Community Forum for sticking with us!

Source:: CloudFlare